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During Thunderstorms and Lightning

If thunderstorm and lightning are occurring in your area, you should:

  • Use your battery-operated NOAA Weather Radio for updates from local officials.
  • Avoid contact with corded phones and devices including those plugged into electric for recharging.  Cordless and wireless phones not connected to wall outlets are OK to use.
  • Avoid contact with electrical equipment or cords. Unplug appliances and other electrical items such as computers and turn off air conditioners. Power surges from lightning can cause serious damage.
  • Avoid contact with plumbing. Do not wash your hands, do not take a shower, do not wash dishes, and do not do laundry. Plumbing and bathroom fixtures can conduct electricity.
  • Stay away from windows and doors, and stay off porches.
  • Do not lie on concrete floors and do not lean against concrete walls.
  • Avoid natural lightning rods such as a tall, isolated tree in an open area.
  • Avoid hilltops, open fields, the beach or a boat on the water.
  • Take shelter in a sturdy building. Avoid isolated sheds or other small structures in open areas.
  • Avoid contact with anything metal—tractors, farm equipment, motorcycles, golf carts, golf clubs, and bicycles.
  • If you are driving, try to safely exit the roadway and park. Stay in the vehicle and turn on the emergency flashers until the heavy rain ends. Avoid touching metal or other surfaces that conduct electricity in and outside the vehicle.


What

All thunderstorms are dangerous. Every thunderstorm produces lightning. While lightning fatalities have decreased over the past 30 years, lightning continues to be one of the top three storm-related killers in the United States. On average in the U.S., lightning kills 51 people and injures hundreds more. Although most lightning victims survive, people struck by lightning often report a variety of long-term, debilitating symptoms.

Other associated dangers of thunderstorms include tornadoes, strong winds, hail and flash flooding. Flash flooding is responsible for more fatalities – more than 140 annually – than any other thunderstorm-associated hazard. Dry thunderstorms that do not produce rain that reaches the ground are most prevalent in the western United States. Falling raindrops evaporate, but lightning can still reach the ground and can start wildfires.


Where

Summer storms and hotter than normal temperatures can happen in every region of the country.​

When

Summer storms can occur at almost any time of year but are more frequent from late spring to late fall depending on the region.

​​Be Prepared


To prepare for a thunderstorm, you should do the following:

  • To begin preparing, you should build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Remove dead or rotting trees and branches that could fall and cause injury or damage during a severe thunderstorm.
  • Postpone outdoor activities.
  • Secure outdoor objects that could blow away or cause damage.
  • Get inside a home, building, or hard top automobile (not a convertible). Although you may be injured if lightning strikes your car, you are much safer inside a vehicle than outside.
  • Remember, rubber-soled shoes and rubber tires provide NO protection from lightning. However, the steel frame of a hard-topped vehicle provides increased protection if you are not touching metal.
  • Shutter windows and secure outside doors. If shutters are not available, close window blinds, shades or curtains.
  • Unplug any electronic equipment well before the storm arrives


Prepare your vehicle:

  • Get your vehicle ready for warmer weather: Have a mechanic check coolant, brakes, air conditioning, tires, and windshield wipers to ensure they are in good shape. In the event of severe weather, fill up the gas tank in case the power goes out.
  • Keep an extra emergency kit specifically created for your car. In addition to the basic essentials, consider adding a portable cell phone charger, rain gear, dry clothing, waterproof shoes and water.


Basic Preparedness Tips:


  • Make sure you have a cell phone with an emergency charging option (car, solar, hand crank, etc.) in case of a power failure.
  • People who depend on electricity to operate medical equipment should have alternate arrangements in place in case power is out for an extended period of time.
  • Plan to check on elderly/disabled relatives and neighbors.
  • Plan to bring pets inside.
  • Know where the manual release lever of your electric garage door opener is located and how to operate it in case you lose power.
  • Fill a gallon container with water and place them in the freezer to help keep food cold.
  • A NOAA Weather Radio broadcasts alerts and warnings directly from the NWS for all hazards. You may also sign up in advance to receive notifications from your local emergency services.


Lightning Risk Reduction When Outdoors

  • If you are in a forest then, seek shelter in a low area under a thick growth of small trees.​
  • In an open area, go to a low place such as a ravine or valley. Be alert for flash floods.
  • On open water, get to land and find shelter immediately.


Facts about Thunderstorms

  • They may occur singly, in clusters or in lines.
  • Some of the most severe occur when a single thunderstorm affects one location for an extended time.
  • Thunderstorms typically produce heavy rain for a brief period, anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour.
  • Warm, humid conditions are highly favorable for thunderstorm development.
  • About 10 percent of thunderstorms are classified as severe – one that produces hail at least an inch or larger in diameter, has winds of 58 miles per hour or higher or produces a tornado.


Facts about Lightning

  • Lightning’s unpredictability increases the risk to individuals and property.
  • Lightning often strikes outside of heavy rain and may occur as far as 10 miles away from any rainfall.
  • “Heat lightning” is actually lightning from a thunderstorm too far away from thunder to be heard. However, the storm may be moving in your direction.
  • Most lightning deaths and injuries occur when people are caught outdoors in the summer months during the afternoon and evening.
  • Your chances of being struck by lightning are estimated to be 1 in 600,000 but could be reduced even further by following safety precautions.
  • Lightning strike victims carry no electrical charge and should be attended to immediately.


After a Thunderstorm or Lightning Strike

If lightning strikes you or someone you know, call 9-1-1 for medical assistance as soon as possible. The following are things you should check when you attempt to give aid to a victim of lightning:

  • Breathing - if breathing has stopped, begin mouth-to-mouth resuscitation.
  • Heartbeat - if the heart has stopped, administer CPR.
  • Pulse - if the victim has a pulse and is breathing, look for other possible injuries. Check for burns where the lightning entered and left the body. Also be alert for nervous system damage, broken bones and loss of hearing and eyesight.


Watches and Warnings.....


Familiarize yourself with these terms to help identify a thunderstorm hazard:

  • Severe Thunderstorm Watch - Tells you when and where severe thunderstorms are likely to occur. Watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio or television for information.







  • Severe Thunderstorm Warning - Issued when severe weather has been reported by spotters or indicated by radar. Warnings indicate imminent danger to life and property to those in the path of the storm.

     Warmer weather brings a variety of potential severe weather emergencies. As the weather becomes more humid during the summer months the potential for thunder and lightning storms increase. 


     Thanks to our friends at Ready.gov, this information explains what actions you can take to prepare for summer weather and how to understand alerts from the National Weather Service.


Communication and Information is key......

Keep a list of contact information for reference. Contacts should include:

  • Local Emergency Management Office
  • Local Law Enforcement
  • Local EMS and Fire
  • State, County and City/Town Government
  • Local Hospitals
  • Local Utilities
  • Local American Red Cross
  • Local TV Stations
  • Local Radio Stations
  • Your Property Insurance Agent

BASIC PROTECTIVE MEASURES FOR ALL HAZARDS

Some basic protective actions are similar across many different hazards:

  • Physical safety is a concern for all hazards and may involve sheltering or evacuating.
  • Develop a family communications plan
  • Make an emergency supply kit to be prepared for any type of disaster.
  • Learn about receiving emergency alerts and local emergency plans for shelter and evacuation, local emergency contacts, and local advance alerts and warnings.
  • When recovering from a disaster, safety as well as mental and physical well-being must be considered.

BE INFORMED

Learn what protective measures to take before, during, and after an emergency


MYTH: I DON’T NEED TO WORRY ABOUT DISASTERS WHERE I LIVE.

Emergency preparedness is not only for those that live in more disaster prone area like California, the Midwest or the Gulf Coast.


Most communities may be impacted by several types of hazards during a lifetime.


Americans are also traveling more than ever before to areas that may have a higher risk of disaster than at home. Knowing what to do before, during and after an emergency is a critical part of being prepared and may make all the difference when seconds count.


Information provided as part of Be Ready. Montclair can help you to learn about potential emergencies that can happen and how to prepare for and respond to them.

     Launched in May 2014, Be Ready. Montclair is a local public service campaign designed to educate residents and business owners in the Montclair area on how to prepare for and respond to emergencies including natural and man-made disasters.

     The goal of the campaign is to get the public involved and ultimately to increase the level of basic preparedness in our area. 

     It is the overall goal of Montclair Ambulance Unit to offer preparedness planning and assistance to every aspect of our community to help reduce the possibility of catastrophic loss as a result of natural or man-made disasters.

     This site will include seasonal preparedness information such as dealing with cold weather emergencies during the winter months and heat related emergencies during the summer. There will also be important links to local, state and federal agencies for further information on how to prepare for emergencies.